Pets at weddings: a data-driven exploration of how wedding etiquette has evolved

Pets at weddings: a data-driven exploration of how wedding etiquette has evolved
Margaret Davies

We all adore our pets – they’re part of the family. It’s completely understandable, then, that you’d want your animal companion to be part of your big day, along with your other loved ones. Whilst this historically hasn’t been common practice, many modern couples are now breaking with tradition and getting their canines involved in their wedding.

If this is something you’re interested in, you’re not alone. This data-driven guide from 77 Diamonds shows that Google searches for ‘pets at weddings’ are up by 200%, with 8 in 10 British couples wanting their dog to be in attendance at their celebrations. Dream roles include taking part in the first dance, walking the bride down the aisle, being the ring bearer or acting as the ‘Dog of Honour’ – there’s something for every pooch.

But of course, weddings tend to be loud events that are full of excitement, and so it can get a bit much for your pup. You’ll need to consider their needs, creating a safe and quiet space for them to retreat to when their moment in the spotlight is over.

Just don’t forget to snap some cute photos for your wedding album before they go. Read the guide today to learn more about how to make this day special for your whole family, pets included.

 

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